Thursday, March 23, 2017

Call for book manuscripts, 'Church, Faith and Culture in the Medieval West' series

by Erika Gaffney
Your network editor has reposted this from H-Announce. The byline reflects the original authorship.
Type: 
Call for Publications
Date: 
March 17, 2017 to March 17, 2020
Subject Fields: 
European History / Studies, Medieval and Byzantine History / Studies, Religious Studies and Theology
The essential aim of this series is to present high quality, original, and international scholarship, covering all aspects of the Medieval Church and its relationship with the secular world in an accessible form. Previous publications have covered such topics as aspects of Medieval Papal History, including neglected twelfth- and thirteenth-century popes, Monastic and Religious Orders for men and women, Canon Law, Liturgy and Ceremonial, Art, Architecture and Material Culture, Ecclesiastical Administration and Government, as well as aspects of Clerical Life, Councils and so on. Our authors are encouraged to challenge existing orthodoxies on the basis of thorough examination of relevant sources. These books are intended to engage scholars worldwide.
Proposals welcome
The series welcomes scholarly monographs and edited volumes in English by both established and early-career researchers.
Proposals for monographs or edited volumes should kindly follow the standard AUP Proposal format and should also include the envisaged table of contents or overview of the volume and abstracts of the proposed chapters or articles.
Further Information:
Having originated with Ashgate, since 2017, this series is published by Amsterdam University Press.  For questions or to submit a proposal, contact the Commissioning Editor, Erika Gaffney: erika.gaffney@arc-humanities.org.
Contact Info: 

Litigating Women: Negotiating Justice in Courts of Law, c.1100 - c.1750

by Emma Cavell
Your network editor has reposted this from H-Announce. The byline reflects the original authorship.
Type: 
Symposium
Date: 
June 28, 2017 to June 29, 2017
Location: 
United Kingdom
Subject Fields: 
Medieval and Byzantine History / Studies, British History / Studies, European History / Studies, Law and Legal History, Women's & Gender History / Studies
As part of the AHRC-funded collaborative project 'Women Negotiating the Boundaries of Justice: Britain and Ireland, c. 1100-c.1750', and in conjunction with Swansea University's 11th annual 'Symposium by the Sea', this two-day event will explore women's access to justice and use of the lawcourts in Britain and Continental Europe in the medieval and early modern periods. With speakers ranging from senior academics to postgraduate students, we have dedicated 'new researcher' sessions for postgraduates, three keynotes, and a host of fascinating topics that cover, among other things, noblewomen's civil litigation in medieval England, Ireland and Normandy, German and French divorce suits in the Revolutionary period, and women's appeals to the Court of Sequestrations during the English Civil War.
Our three keynotes are:
  • Professor Emerita Janet Loengard, of Moravian College, Pennsylvania: 'Heiresses, widows, felons and others: thirteenth-century women in the king's court'.
  • Professor Sara Butler, The Ohio State University: 'Women and criminal law in medieval England'.
  • Professor Julie Hardwick, The University of Texas at Austin: 'The first time: young workers, consensual relationships, and the shift to physical intimacy in Old Regime France'.
Confirmed speakers include (among many others!):
  • Dr Gwen Seabourne (Bristol)
  • Prof. Loreen L. Giese (Ohio University)
  • Dr Peter L. Larson (University of Central Florida
  • Dr Sparky Booker (Queen’s University Belfast)
  • Laila Scheuch (Max Planck Institute for European Legal History, Frankfurt/Main)
  • Harriet Kersey (Canterbury Christ Church University)
Full fee: £60, student/unwaged £45. Day rate: £35, student/unwaged: £28
For a full programme and a registration form, please go to our symposium page: http://womenhistorylaw.org.uk/c/swansea-symposium

Contact Info: 
Dr Emma Cavell
Department of History
James Callaghan Building
Swansea University
Singleton Park
Swansea SA2 8PP, Wales UK.
Contact Email: 
The inaugural issue of Studies in Late Antiquity: A Journal is now available for free online! You will find:

Editorial Essays
·         “Why Does the World Need a New Journal on Late Antiquity?” by the Editor and Associate Editors
·         “Community Matters” by Elizabeth DePalma Digeser (Editor)

Articles
·         “Late Antiquity and World History: Challenging Conventional Narratives and Analyses” by Mark Humphries
·         “How Perilous was it to Write Political History in Late Antiquity?” by Anthony Kaldellis
·         “From a Classical to a Christian City: Civic Evergetism and Charity in Fifth Century Rome” by Michele Salzman

Book Reviews
·         Digital_Humanities by Anne Burdick, Johanna Drucker, Peter Lunenfeld, Todd Presner and Jeffrey Schnapp
o   Review by Sarah Bond and Thomas Keegan
·         Décadence: “Decline and Fall” of “Other Antiquity”? edited by Marco Formisano, Therese Fuhrer, and Anna-Lena Stock
o   Review by Lorenzo DiTommaso
·         A State of Mixture: Christians, Zoroastrians, and Iranian Political Culture in Late Antiquity by Richard E. Payne
o   Review by Greg Fisher
·         From Shame to Sin: The Christian Transformation of Sexual Morality in Late Antiquity by Kyle Harper
o   Review by Wendy Mayer
·         The Arid Lands: History, Power, Knowledge by Diana K. Davis
o   Review by Steven E. Sidebotham
Call for papers
"Feeding on Dreams: Exiles and Exile in Late Antiquity."

A Workshop at Yale University, 23-25 April 2018

Organized by Maria Doerfler (Yale University) and Geoffrey Nathan (University of New South Wales)

Being barred from one’s native lands, state and/or community was and continues to be a unique form of punishment.  Individuals or groups might not only suffer from physical, economic and legal privation, but also social and cultural exclusion to the point of a kind of social death.  In Late Antiquity, the degree of political and religious change made exile perhaps more likely for an increasingly diverse group, but may have also changed the nature of exile itself.  Recent work both on conceptual exile and the exile of clerics raises the possibility of expanding the scope of scholarly conversations surrounding the practice in this period.   This workshop’s purpose is to consider different experiences and conceptions of formal and informal banishment to arrive at a more holistic understanding of the social, cultural, and literary phenomenon of exile in late antiquity. 

The organizers thus invite papers to explore the nature of exile and exiles in Late Antiquity (ca.300-650 CE).  We welcome contributors to interpret these concepts broadly, and seek a wide variety of papers and disciplinary approaches.

Topics might include, but are not limited to:

Political and religious exile
Relegatio, deportatio, postliminium: exile in law
Self-exile
Conceptual exile (spiritual and metaphorical exile)
Treatments of exile in the religions of Late Antiquity
Diasporas and refugees
The archaeology of exile

After the workshop, participants will be invited to submit their revised papers for publication. Please send abstracts of up to 500 words exileinlateantiquity@gmail.com.  Alternatively, abstracts may be sent to either Maria Doerfler (maria.doerfler@yale.edu) or Geoff Nathan (g.nathan@unsw.edu.au) by 14 May 2017. For queries, please email either organizer.

Monday, March 20, 2017

CFPs deadline extended for MWWHA conference on "Reformations and Revolutions in World History"

by Jeanne E. Grant
Call for Proposals
“Reformations and Revolutions in World History”
The Eighth Annual Conference of the 
Midwest World History Association
22-23 September 2017, University of Central Oklahoma (Edmond, Oklahoma)
The proposal deadline has been extended to 15 April 2017
and the keynote is announced.
The Midwest World History Association is happy to announce a call for paper, poster, panel, roundtable, and workshop proposals for its annual conference to be held at the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond, Oklahoma, on September 22nd and 23rd, 2017. The conference theme is ‘Reformations and Revolutions in World History.’
Today the world finds itself at a crossroads, just as it has done so many times before and will undoubtedly do so in the future.  The crises faced today – a resurgence in Nationalism, extremism, the continuance of war and its results: refugees, poverty, and hunger – seem to be testing the anchors of contemporary values of peace, tolerance, and humanity.
Far from the first crisis the world has faced, it is nevertheless important to grasp its history and the history of the ideas that have shaped it to understand the events of today. This year, 2017, will see the commemoration of the Protestant Reformation (1517), the Russian Revolution (1917), the independence of India and Pakistan (1947), the first sub-Saharan African Independence in Ghana (1957), and the signature of the Treaty of Rome (1957). Other anniversaries marked in 2017 include, but are not limited to, the Tacfarinas uprising against the Romans in 17 CE, the first official European diplomatic mission to China (1517), US entry into the First World War (1917), the internationalization of the Spanish Civil War (1937), the Palestine Partition Resolution (1947), the 1947 Truman Doctrine, and the 1967 Arab-Israeli War.                                                                             
This conference will bring together emerging scholars, early career researchers, established academics from a variety of disciplines, and 6th-12th-grade teachers to provide a platform to explore the implications and significance the Reformation and revolutions have in the world. We encourage contributions from a range of perspectives, including social, political, intellectual and cultural history; social and cultural geography; social and political science; and 9-12 lesson plans. Possible subjects may include, but are not limited to:
  • How has the dynamics of ‘reformation' and ‘revolution' worked with and against one another in world history?
  • What impact have reform and/or revolutionary change had in the world?
  • What effects have revolutionary and/or reformist approaches to crisis had in the past?
  •  How are landmark moments such as the Reformation, and the numerous revolutions in world history, remembered/represented?
  •  To what extent/in what ways are contemporary events the legacy of previous crises, or of attempts to reform/transform the world?
  • How have specific political ideas (liberalism, capitalism, communism, socialism, freedom, justice, governmentality, legitimacy—as well as [post]colonialism and feminism) shaped historical development, particularly in moments of crisis
  • How has world history given rise to new or revolutionary political ideas?
Proposals on any aspect of World History scholarship and teaching are also welcome.
The keynote speaker will be Dr. Amy Nelson Burnett, Paula and D.B. Varner University Professor of History, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Professor Burnett’s work has focused on the Protestant Reformation in Germany and Switzerland, with emphasis on the exchange of ideas through printing and debate. Among her many books, Teaching the Reformation: Ministers and their Message in Basel, 1529-1629 (Oxford University Press, 2008) won the Gerald Strauss Prize awarded by the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference. Dr. Burnett will deliver a keynote entitled, “Reform, Dissent, and Toleration: The Reformation as a Crisis of Authority.”
Please send an abstract of 250 words, together with a short curriculum vitae, to the Program Committee Chair, Dr. Nikki Magie at chair@mwwha.org no later than 15 April 2017 (extended deadline). Questions about the conference can also be directed to this address. Where a complete panel is proposed, the convener should also include a 250-word abstract of the panel theme. Each panelist should plan to spend no more than 20 minutes presenting her or his paper.
Presenters must register for the conference by 15 August 2017 to be included in the program.
The MWWHA will offer up to three competitive Graduate Student Awards to offset part of the conference costs. Graduate students interested in applying should include a letter with their conference proposal explaining how the conference helps them with their studies, teaching, and/or future career plans as well as how their paper fits with the conference theme and the mission of the MWWHA.
We also invite accepted papers to be submitted to our journal, The Middle Ground, for potential publication: http://themiddlegroundjournal.org/.
Further information about the MWWHA, including membership and conference registration (when it becomes available), can be found on our website: http://mwwha.org/.
Presenters will be notified of acceptance by 15 May 2017.

To Attend: Christian Bodies, Pagan Images (April 3, 2017)

by Brandie Ratliff
The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA, is pleased to announce the final lecture in its 2016–2017 lecture series:
Monday, April 3, 2017, 6:15 pm
Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA
Christian Bodies, Pagan Images: Women, Beauty, and Morality in Byzantium
Alicia Walker, Bryn Mawr College, explores how Byzantine women’s bodies were put in dialogue with visual and textual portrayals of pagan goddesses and heroines, and how these practices changed in fundamental ways from the early to middle Byzantine eras.
Details at maryjahariscenter.org/events/christian-bodies-pagan-images.
Contact: Brandie Ratliff, Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture
Mary Jaharis Center lectures are co-sponsored by Harvard University Standing Committee on Medieval Studies.
Call for papers
"Feeding on Dreams: Exiles and Exile in Late Antiquity."

A Workshop at Yale University, 23-25 April 2018

Organized by Maria Doerfler (Yale University) and Geoffrey Nathan (University of New South Wales)

Being barred from one’s native lands, state and/or community was and continues to be a unique form of punishment.  Individuals or groups might not only suffer from physical, economic and legal privation, but also social and cultural exclusion to the point of a kind of social death.  In Late Antiquity, the degree of political and religious change made exile perhaps more likely for an increasingly diverse group, but may have also changed the nature of exile itself.  Recent work both on conceptual exile and the exile of clerics raises the possibility of expanding the scope of scholarly conversations surrounding the practice in this period.   This workshop’s purpose is to consider different experiences and conceptions of formal and informal banishment to arrive at a more holistic understanding of the social, cultural, and literary phenomenon of exile in late antiquity. 

The organizers thus invite papers to explore the nature of exile and exiles in Late Antiquity (ca.300-650 CE).  We welcome contributors to interpret these concepts broadly, and seek a wide variety of papers and disciplinary approaches.

Topics might include, but are not limited to:

Political and religious exile
Relegatio, deportatio, postliminium: exile in law
Self-exile
Conceptual exile (spiritual and metaphorical exile)
Treatments of exile in the religions of Late Antiquity
Diasporas and refugees
The archaeology of exile

After the workshop, participants will be invited to submit their revised papers for publication. Please send abstracts of up to 500 words exileinlateantiquity@gmail.com.  Alternatively, abstracts may be sent to either Maria Doerfler (maria.doerfler@yale.edu) or Geoff Nathan (g.nathan@unsw.edu.au) by 14 May 2017. For queries, please email either organizer.