Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Dear colleagues,

Please consider submitting an abstract for the upcoming graduate conference of the Italian Department at Columbia University, to be held on February 3-4th, 2017. 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 
Department of Italian 
GRADUATE CONFERENCE
CALL FOR PAPERS
Great Incompletes: Italy’s Unfinished Endeavors
3-4 FEBRUARY 2017Keynote speaker: Professor Thomas Harrison (UCLA)
This conference will investigate the question of incompleteness in Italian cultural and social history through an array of theoretical perspectives and case studies. From the unfinished works of Dante to Puccini’s Turandot, from Gramsci’s Quaderni del carcere to the grandi opere of the Salerno-Reggio Calabria, the list of “great incompletes” is as long as it is diverse. What do incomplete projects have in common? How does an unfinished film differ from an unfinished bridge or novel? How can a text be deemed complete? Are our expectations as readers, viewers and witnesses influenced because of this purported unfinished-ness?
The history of Italian art, philosophy and politics is also brimming with works that deploy incompleteness as a deliberate narrative device. Michelangelo’s poetics of non-finito and the aesthetic debate on the possibility/impossibility of reaching perfection in art, reappears in Calvino’s Se una notte d’inverno un viaggiatore. The openness of Gadda’s Quer pasticciaccio brutto de via Merulana challenges the limits of a literary genre, just as Antonioni’s inherently incomplete plots inform his spatial and temporal filmic aesthetics. Many have noticed a connection between unfinished infrastructure projects, clientelism, corruption, and organized crime: the works’ ability to remain perpetually “in progress” is precisely their point.
We welcome papers in English that explore the viability of incompleteness as a theoretical notion across media, its scope as a technique that may or may not solicit a specific hermeneutical strategy, and finally its implications as a political and philosophical concept.
Possible topics may include:
  • -  Unfinished works and their textual tradition
  • -  Infrastructural incompleteness and organized crime
  • -  A poetics of non-finito
  • -  Reaching perfection in art
  • -  Incompleteness across media
  • -  Incompleteness as a narrative device
  • -  Pastiche/Patchworks vs. Incompleteness
  • -  Hermeneutical strategies facing incompleteness
  • -  Incomplete plots/spaces/times
  • -  Incompleteness vs. Failure
    Please send a 250-word abstract and a brief bio (50-60 words) in English no later than December, 11th to: graditalian.columbia@gmail.com
    The conference organizers:
  • Carlo Arrigoni
  • Nassime Chida
  • Massimiliano Delfino
  • Matteo Pace
In 1967, during a period of intense student protests, the AAUP and four other groups issued a Joint Statement on Rights and Freedoms of Students. Many issues covered in the statement are as pertinent fifty years later as they were in 1967. The AAUP invites proposals for presentations focused on these issues for our 2017 Annual Conference, to be held June 14–18 in Washington, DC.
The issues include the following:
  • Freedom of access to higher education
  • Rights of students in the classroom
  • Student rights outside the classroom (for example, in forming student groups or participating in protests)
  • The right to be free from discrimination on the basis of race, gender, age, disability, national origin, and sexual orientation
  • Evaluation of students
  • The roles of faculty advisers of student groups
  • Student-invited speakers
  • The intersection of institutional disciplinary authority and the law
  • Freedom of student press and other publications
  • Student participation in institutional government
  • Procedural standards in disciplinary proceedings
Presentations might also:
  • Explore student protest movements of the past
  • Analyze current student activism on race, student debt, gender, labor justice, or other issues
  • Comment on the joint statement itself
  • Discuss the rights of students to organize labor unions
  • Explore the possibilities for student activism opened up by digital tools
Presentation proposals on other topics of interest to a diverse, multidisciplinary higher education audience are welcome. We encourage proposals that raise questions, engage conference participants in discussion, and foster dialogue. Proposals will be accepted through December 13, 2016. See our website for complete submission details: https://www.aaup.org/CFP-2017
Activism and Art
Have student activists on your campus created posters, puppets, or other types of compelling protest art? We’d like to hear from you! Please send a description or photos along with contact information to gbradley@aaup.org.
Call For Papers:
Medieval Rites: Reading the Writing, Yale University, New Haven, CT
April 21-23, 2017
 
CFP Deadline: January 1, 2017
 
 
To study the history of the Christian liturgy is usually to study texts. Though some
texts survive even from the period of the early Church, it was mostly during the Middle Ages that thousands of texts—prayers, hymns, and lections—were compiled and organized into large and complex liturgical books. Some of these medieval liturgical books continued to be used by worshippers even into modern times, or served as modelsor anti-models for compilers of post-medieval liturgical books.
 
Moving beyond the notion that writing was simply a means of coordinating ritual
activity, or an alternative to oral transmission, Medieval Rites: Reading the Writing will explore the breadth of possible literate interactions with Christian liturgy during, before, and after the Middle Ages, in both Eastern and Western traditions.
 
Anyone interested in reading a 20-minute paper at the conference may send a 300-word abstract toismevents@yale.edu, by 1 January 2017.
 
Authors of accepted proposals will be notified by email no later than the end of January.
 
Conference organizers:
Henry Parkes (Yale Institute of Sacred Music)
Peter Jeffery (University of Notre Dame)
 

Monday, November 21, 2016

Sunday, November 20, 2016

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 
Department of Italian 
GRADUATE CONFERENCE
CALL FOR PAPERS
Great Incompletes: Italy’s Unfinished Endeavors
3-4 FEBRUARY 2017
Keynote speaker: Professor Thomas Harrison (UCLA)
This conference will investigate the question of incompleteness in Italian cultural and social history through an array of theoretical perspectives and case studies. From the unfinished works of Dante to Puccini’s Turandot, from Gramsci’s Quaderni del carcere to the grandi opere of the Salerno-Reggio Calabria, the list of “great incompletes” is as long as it is diverse. What do incomplete projects have in common? How does an unfinished film differ from an unfinished bridge or novel? How can a text be deemed complete? Are our expectations as readers, viewers and witnesses influenced because of this purported unfinished-ness?
The history of Italian art, philosophy and politics is also brimming with works that deploy incompleteness as a deliberate narrative device. Michelangelo’s poetics of non-finito and the aesthetic debate on the possibility/impossibility of reaching perfection in art, reappears in Calvino’s Se una notte d’inverno un viaggiatore. The openness of Gadda’s Quer pasticciaccio brutto de via Merulana challenges the limits of a literary genre, just as Antonioni’s inherently incomplete plots inform his spatial and temporal filmic aesthetics. Many have noticed a connection between unfinished infrastructure projects, clientelism, corruption, and organized crime: the works’ ability to remain perpetually “in progress” is precisely their point.
We welcome papers in English that explore the viability of incompleteness as a theoretical notion across media, its scope as a technique that may or may not solicit a specific hermeneutical strategy, and finally its implications as a political and philosophical concept.
Possible topics may include:
  • -  Unfinished works and their textual tradition
  • -  Infrastructural incompleteness and organized crime
  • -  A poetics of non-finito
  • -  Reaching perfection in art
  • -  Incompleteness across media
  • -  Incompleteness as a narrative device
  • -  Pastiche/Patchworks vs. Incompleteness
  • -  Hermeneutical strategies facing incompleteness
  • -  Incomplete plots/spaces/times
  • -  Incompleteness vs. Failure
    Please send a 250-word abstract and a brief bio (50-60 words) in English no later than November, 27th to: graditalian.columbia@gmail.com
    The conference organizers:
    Carlo Arrigoni 
  • Nassime Chida 
  • Massimiliano Delfino 
  • Matteo Pace 



Matteo Pace
Ph.D. Candidate - Teaching Fellow
Department of Italian
Columbia University

Sunday, November 13, 2016

CFP: Concealment and Revelation in the Art of the Middle Ages (Nicosia, 22-24 September 2017)

CFP Deadline:  30 April 2017

‘To reveal art and conceal the artist is art’s aim’ – thus Oscar Wilde in his aphoristic Preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891). In the western intellectual tradition, art has repeatedly been conceived and understood as existing at the intersection of the antithetical notions of concealment and revelation – from the old unattributed adage that ‘it is true art to conceal art’ (ars est celare artem) to Robert Rauschenberg’s lapidary statement about the ability of a work of art to reveal something beyond itself (‘A light bulb in the dark cannot show itself without showing you something else too’, scribbled in pencil on the photo collage entitled Random Orderc. 1963). Veiled or unveiled, obscured or illuminated, opaque or transparent, works of art are often invested with meaning(s) and function(s) at the liminal moment of transition from the one state to the next; after all, to resort again to Wilde’s witty prose, ‘the commonest thing is delightful, if one only hides it’.

Recent scholarship on medieval art has brought such considerations to the fore, by tackling issues of screening, veiling / unveiling, temporal and performative transformations, the permeability of barriers and the movement of objects in space, among others. The visibility of sacred relics and their reliquaries, the metal revetments and textile curtains of miracle-working icons, the folding wings of northern European altarpieces, the parting womb of the Vierges ouvrantes or Schreinmadonnen and the porosity of choir screens East and West have all received fairly extensive treatment in monographic studies and specialist articles. Nevertheless, the juxtaposition of these individual phenomena within a broader framework, encompassing both the religious and secular sphere, as well as several different religious traditions, has only seldom been attempted.

The present conference aspires to explore the role of the concept and the act of concealment and revelation in the arts of the Latin West, Byzantium, Islam and Judaism in the course of the Middle Ages (defined chronologically as c. 500-c. 1500). Subjects to be broached include, but are not limited to, the use of curtains or veils in screening objects or spaces; the function of permeable screens (in a variety of materials and media) in structuring accessibility, whether physical, visual, aural or spiritual; the performative aspect of concealing and revealing in all its civic and private manifestations, and the issues of emotional manipulation thereby raised; the role of gesture and spatial motion in the performance of concealment and revelation; the hierarchy of sacred and secular space as the outcome of its compartmentalisation; and the representation of these practices in the pictorial arts.

The conference is planned as a three-day event, to take place at the Archaeological Research Unit of the University of Cyprus, Nicosia, in 22-24 September 2017. Due to budgetary constraints, the speakers’ travel and accommodation expenses cannot be covered, but every effort will be made to secure conference rates at hotels near the conference venue. There is no registration fee for participation or attendance.

Prospective speakers are invited to submit electronically a title and a 300-word abstract (in either English or Greek) for consideration by 30 April 2017. Please send all materials and address all queries to the conference convenors, Michalis Olympios (olympios.michalis@ucy.ac.cy) and Maria Parani (mparani@ucy.ac.cy).